‘Anonymous’ Hacks Justice Department Computers; Cite Activist’s Death KTLAWASHINGTON, D.C. – A collective of hackers known as Anonymous commandeered a Department of Justice website Saturday to protest what it called the harsh treatment by government prosecutors of Internet activist Aaron Swartz, who committed suicide … Silicon Valley Companies Lobbying Against Europe’s Privacy Proposals New York Times By: Kevin J. O’Brien Mr. Wizner said the United States had no equivalent to Europe’s general data protection law. American law, he said, guarantees consumer privacy only in specific cases, like medical and financial records, but permits online companies to conduct … Officials At Cheyney U. Warning Students About Personal Data Breach CBS Local CHEYNEY, Pa. (AP) – Officials at Cheyney University are urging students to check their credit reports after an inadvertent release of their personal data, including Social Security numbers. The historically black college near Philadelphia apologized … Shands Jacksonville Clinic Reports…       Read More

Cyber Risk Is Not Translating Into Boardroom Discussion  Infosecurity MagazineResponsibility for cyber risk starts and stops with the board, says GCHQ; cyber attack is the most likely technology risk incident says the World Economic Forum; but the board isn’t taking it seriously, suggests Trustwave. “My organization, GCHQ, now … Data Breach Notification under HIPAA Blogger News Network Data Breach Notification (DBN) has been one of the most contentious issues of HIPAA regulations. Presently breach of unsecured protected information either at the Covered Entity or at the Business Associate entity needs to be reported to the affected … Here’s What’s Wrong With The Hacking Law Used To Target Aaron Swartz Business Insider By: Erin Fuchs In “War Games,” the Matthew Broderick character hacks into a military central computer and nearly starts World War III just by playing what he believes are games. When the CFAA was originally introduced post-“War Games,” it…       Read More

Swartz Suicide Shines Light on Federal Anti-Hacking Law Computerworld By: Jaikumar Vijayan The suicide of Internet activist and pioneer Aaron Swartz has focused attention on what some activists say is the overzealous use of the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) anti-hacking statute. Swartz, 26, hanged himself last …US Government Warns of Serious Hacking Risk for Java Software Users National Post BY: Jim Finkle Hackers have figured out how to exploit Java to install malicious software enabling them to commit crimes ranging from identity theft to making an infected computer part of an ad-hoc network of computers that can be used to attack websites. We are … Federal Agency Loses Data on 583000 Canadians CBC.ca HRSDC Minister Diane Finley says employees who fail to obey new data security policies could face dismissal. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press). “I have requested that HRSDC employees across Canada receive comprehensive communications on the ……       Read More

FIRST ROUND TO EMPLOYER IN CASE OF ALLEGED DATA THEFT BY EMPLOYEE At the end of 2012, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals issued an opinion allowing an employer in Connecticut to bring suit in Connecticut against its employee for electronic data theft, even though the employee actually lived and worked in Canada. In MacDermid, Inc. v. Dieter[1], MacDermid is a specialty chemical company located in Waterbury, Connecticut.  Dieter lived in Ontario, Canada, and worked there as an account manager for MacDermid.  MacDermid stored confidential and proprietary electronic data on its computer servers in Waterbury.  Employees could access that information only by accessing the Waterbury servers.  MacDermid, quite wisely, made all employees aware that the e-mail system, and their confidential and proprietary information, was stored on the Waterbury servers.  MacDermid also had employees agree in writing to safeguard and properly use MacDermid’s confidential information, and that they were not authorized…       Read More

At the end of 2012, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals issued an opinion allowing an employer in Connecticut to bring suit in Connecticut against its employee for electronic data theft, even though the employee actually lived and worked in Canada. In MacDermid, Inc. v. Dieter[1], MacDermid is a specialty chemical company located in Waterbury, Connecticut.  Dieter lived in Ontario, Canada, and worked there as an account manager for MacDermid.  MacDermid stored confidential and proprietary electronic data on its computer servers in Waterbury.  Employees could access that information only by accessing the Waterbury servers.  MacDermid, quite wisely, made all employees aware that the e-mail system, and their confidential and proprietary information, was stored on the Waterbury servers.  MacDermid also had employees agree in writing to safeguard and properly use MacDermid’s confidential information, and that they were not authorized to transfer such information to a personal e-mail account. MacDermid sued Dieter…       Read More

BB&T, PNC Say They’ve Been Hit by Cyber Hackers Winston-Salem Journal By: Richard CraverBB&T Corp. and PNC Financial Services Corp. said Friday they have experienced this week another wave of website “denial of service” disruptions that could be coming from cyber hackers. Many of the nation’s top 10 banks were victims of cyber hacking in … Germany Won’t Be Friends With Facebook Unless Privacy Policies Are Changed RT By: Thierry Roge “It is unacceptable that a US portal like Facebook violates German data protection law, unopposed and with no prospect of an end,” data protection commissioner for the northern German state of Schleswig-Holstein, Thilo Weicher, said in letters … Editorial: Hospice Fine Costly Lesson About Health Data Security The Spokesman Review Hospice of North Idaho takes great care of people, but one of its employees failed to take care with a laptop. That lapse cost the organization $50,000. The computer…       Read More

Foursquare User Data Is About To Get Way More Public Business Insider By: Dylan LoveFoursquare checkins used to show a user’s first name and last initial, but beginning January 28, 2013, checkins will publicly display a user’s full name. Additionally, venue owners wanting to take a closer look at checkins will have access to “more of … Stolen Laptop Containing Information of 4000 UM Hospital Patients Still Missing AnnArbor.com By: Amy Biolchini The names of the two other hospitals involved in the data breach have not been released because they have yet to notify their patients, Simm said. Omnicell, based in Mountain View, Calif., installs automation equipment and software to help UMHS manage … Limit On Kids’ Data May Be A Milestone Sacramento Bee By: Lindsay Wise Privacy advocates say the changes set the stage for adult consumers to demand the same kind of privacy protection themselves. The tech industry,…       Read More