fbpx

Written by: Jacqueline Voronov, Esq. and Jeffrey M. Daitz, Esq. In a very pro-employee ruling, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York struck down four (4) key provisions of the U.S. Department of Labor’s (“DOL”) regulations implementing the paid leave provisions of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”).  The August 3, 2020 ruling came down in a lawsuit filed by the State of New

Written by: Melanie V. Slaton, Esq.,  Mariel E. Smith, Esq., and Nicholas J. Garcia, Esq. On June 15, 2020, the Supreme Court of the United States (“SCOTUS”) delivered the landmark opinion in Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia and broadened Title VII liability to include actions by an employer based on the homosexuality or transgender status of the individual employee.  SCOTUS summarizes the facts before it in one simple sentence: “An employer fired

Written by: Melanie V. Slaton, Esq.,  Mariel E. Smith, Esq., and Nicholas J. Garcia, Esq. As states struggle through the process of re-opening in the wake of COVD-19, many employers are also wrestling with the question of what to do about employees who refuse work due to safety concerns or in order to take advantage of recently increased unemployment benefits. Alabama Department of Labor Secretary Fitzgerald Washington has taken a

Written by: Jacqueline Voronov, Esq. and Jeffrey M. Daitz, Esq.  On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) into law.  The FFCRA modified the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and created a new paid sick leave policy to assist workers who contract COVID-19, are caring for family members with COVID-19, or face other extenuating family circumstances, such as a lack of childcare due

Written by: Jacqueline Voronov, Esq., Jeffrey M. Daitz, Esq., and Christopher Eads, Esq. Perhaps bipartisan bills really do exist? On March 14, 2020, the House of Representatives passed the Emergency Families First Coronavirus Response Act ("EFCRA"), a sweeping bill aiming to soften the economic blow that many Americans are expected to feel as stores close, people stay home and stock markets plunge.  Lawmakers are currently finalizing the Act, which

Written by: Jacqueline Voronov, Esq.  and Jeffrey M. Daitz, Esq. The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak that originated in Wuhan, China has spread to at least 95 countries and has sickened more than 100,000 people, leading to increased anxiety and confusion across the globe.  Amidst fears of potential business disruption, the spread of this novel virus serves as a wake-up call for companies to carefully review the policies and procedures they

Written by: Mariel Smith, Esq. Employers should take note that the CROWN Act is now law in several states and is being considered in many others.  The CROWN Act, which stands for “Create a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair,” is a law that prohibits discrimination based on hairstyle and hair texture. It is the first legislation passed at the state level in the U.S. to prohibit such

Written by: Jacqueline Voronov, Esq. and Jeffrey Daitz, Esq. What You Already Know… Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a federal law that prohibits employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin and religion. It generally applies to employers with 15 or more employees, including federal, state and local governments. Title VII also applies to private and public colleges and universities, employment

Written by: Brittany Cone, Esq. & Jordan Johnson, Esq. On May 7, 2018, then Governor Nathan Deal signed Georgia’s new “Long-term Care Background Check Program” (the Program) into law with the purpose of promoting public safety and providing for comprehensive criminal background checks for owners, applicants for employment, and direct access employees. In many ways, this Program completely overhauls the laws applicable to long-term care facilities. Beginning October 1,

Written by: Mariel Smith, Esq. On September 24, 2019, the Department of Labor (DOL) issued its final rule modifying the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) overtime rules for executive, administrative, professional, computing positions (white collar), and highly compensated employees. The rule goes into effect on January 1, 2020 and it increases the minimum salary that employees must be paid to qualify for the white collar or highly compensated exemptions. What does