Written by: Jacqueline Voronov, Esq., Jeffrey M. Daitz, Esq., and Christopher Eads, Esq. Perhaps bipartisan bills really do exist? On March 14, 2020, the House of Representatives passed the Emergency Families First Coronavirus Response Act ("EFCRA"), a sweeping bill aiming to soften the economic blow that many Americans are expected to feel as stores close, people stay home and stock markets plunge.  Lawmakers are currently finalizing the Act, which

Written by: Jacqueline Voronov, Esq.  and Jeffrey M. Daitz, Esq. The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak that originated in Wuhan, China has spread to at least 95 countries and has sickened more than 100,000 people, leading to increased anxiety and confusion across the globe.  Amidst fears of potential business disruption, the spread of this novel virus serves as a wake-up call for companies to carefully review the policies and procedures they

Written by: Mariel Smith, Esq. Employers should take note that the CROWN Act is now law in several states and is being considered in many others.  The CROWN Act, which stands for “Create a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair,” is a law that prohibits discrimination based on hairstyle and hair texture. It is the first legislation passed at the state level in the U.S. to prohibit such

Written by: Jacqueline Voronov, Esq. and Jeffrey Daitz, Esq. What You Already Know… Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a federal law that prohibits employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin and religion. It generally applies to employers with 15 or more employees, including federal, state and local governments. Title VII also applies to private and public colleges and universities, employment

Written by: Brittany Cone, Esq. & Jordan Johnson, Esq. On May 7, 2018, then Governor Nathan Deal signed Georgia’s new “Long-term Care Background Check Program” (the Program) into law with the purpose of promoting public safety and providing for comprehensive criminal background checks for owners, applicants for employment, and direct access employees. In many ways, this Program completely overhauls the laws applicable to long-term care facilities. Beginning October 1,

Written by: Mariel Smith, Esq. On September 24, 2019, the Department of Labor (DOL) issued its final rule modifying the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) overtime rules for executive, administrative, professional, computing positions (white collar), and highly compensated employees. The rule goes into effect on January 1, 2020 and it increases the minimum salary that employees must be paid to qualify for the white collar or highly compensated exemptions. What does

Written by: Jacqueline Voronov, Esq. and Jeffrey Daitz, Esq.  Hey New Jersey business owners- listen up! The State of New Jersey wants you to know that it is definitely pro-employee when it comes to wage and hour laws.   Under the robust new Wage Theft Act (S-1790), touted as the "toughest wage theft statute in the country," employers that violate wage and hour laws by not paying minimum wage, overtime

Written by: Jacqueline Voronov, Esq. The #TimesUp and #MeToo movements just bagged MAJOR wins in New York on Wednesday when state lawmakers passed sweeping anti-harassment legislation that will lower the bar for what qualifies as sexual harassment, among other things.  These changes build on a slate of laws that Gov. Cuomo signed last year amid the peak of the #MeToo movement that banned most nondisclosure agreements and mandatory arbitration

Written by: Jacqueline Voronov, Esq. and Jeff Daitz, Esq. That's right! Effective March 18, 2019, employment contracts, discrimination, harassment or retaliation related settlement agreements can no longer contain non-disclosure agreements (“NDAs”) against the employee if it has the “purpose or effect of concealing the details relating to a claim of discrimination, retaliation, or harassment…” This warrants repeating-provisions in any employment contract or settlement agreement that have the purpose or effect

Written by: Allison Averbuch, Esq. On March 7, 2019, the Department of Labor issued a proposed rule change that would raise the salary test for exemption from overtime pay from $23,660 per year ($455 per week) to $35,308 per year ($679 per week). What does the proposed rule change mean for my business? If the rule becomes final, many employees making between $23,660 and $35,508 will no longer meet the