As more opioid cases are going to trial across the country, a $2.2 million jury verdict in favor of a Philadelphia plaintiff establishes noteworthy precedent in excessive prescription claims. Plaintiff Yvonne Rivera alleged that her pain management physician, Dr. Jeffrey Bado, treated her with “excessively high” doses of the powerful opioid painkiller Fentanyl to treat recurring foot pain starting in 2010. The high doses continued even after the patient sometimes

The Department of Justice explicitly designated 12 federal prosecutors across the country as part of the Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Units.  These Units are assigned to areas where the most opioid drug-related deaths have occurred: California, Nevada, Alabama, Central Florida, East Tennessee, West Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Maryland.

Written by: Jodi Barrett, Esq. & Kate Watson, Esq. OVERVIEW1) To combat the national opioid epidemic, in March 2018, the Florida Legislature passed laws creating new limits on prescriptions for pain medication. These restrictions do not apply to patients suffering pain from: Cancer; Terminal illness; Provision of relief for symptoms related to an incurable, progressive illness or injury (chronic nonmalignant pain); Palliative care; or Serious traumatic injuries. The law (Section 456.44(3)(d), F.S.) specifies

By Daniel R. Crumby, Esq., MBA, MHA, CHC1) The Department of Justice explicitly designated 12 federal prosecutors across the country as part of the Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Units. These Units are assigned to areas where the most opioid drug-related deaths have occurred: California, Nevada, Alabama, Central Florida, East Tennessee, West Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Maryland. Members of these Units also includes numerous federal, state,

Written by: Ryan Donihue, Esq. Beginning in 2016 and continuing to date, mainstream media has brought the ever present and alarming increasing rate of dependence on opioids to the forefront of our daily lives. Surprisingly, the media’s attention toward the nation’s “Opioid Epidemic” has been largely silent and unreported as to three of the most medically complicated and challenging groups of patients’ whom healthcare providers examine, diagnose and treat on

Written by: Jill Bechtold, Esq; Jacquelyn S. Clarke, Esq.; John E. Hall, Jr., Esq.; Stephanie R. McDonald, Esq; Jacob Raehn, Esq.; and Annalese Reese, Esq. Introduction The opioid epidemic in the United States rages on, and the legal battles are just beginning to heat up. Individuals and state governments are bringing claims against manufacturers, distributors, large drugstore chains, and individual prescribers. At least twenty-five states, cities and counties have filed opioid-related actions in the past year,

Written by: Jacob Raehn, Esq. “More Americans died from drug overdoses in 2016 than those who lost their lives in the Vietnam War.”1) The Proposed Federal Budget will Simultaneously Fund Opioid Addiction Treatment and Cut Medicare Spending: As of February 12, 2018, the proposed Federal Budget for FY2019 has been submitted to Congress, and it specifically addresses “Combatting the Drug Abuse and Opioid Overdose Epidemic.” The proposal allocates $13 billion to combat

Written by: Brent Allen, Esq. and Adam Prom, Esq. Florida is on the front lines of the opioid epidemic. According to the Florida Behavioral Health Association, opioid-related hospital costs amounted to $1.1 billion in 2015.1) This figure represents a steady increase in opioid-related hospital costs year over year, which were $460 million in 2010 and $933 million in 2014.2) Moreover, according to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement Medical Examiner’s Commission there were 5,725

With the opioid crisis heavily in the forefront of the public’s mind, particular attention must be given as new avenues for liability emerge. Most blame pharmaceutical companies for pushing drugs like Oxycontin, Vicodin, and Morphine into the market. However, patients are beginning to pursue more claims  against their individual prescribers, and both state and federal governments have begun to crack down on pharmacists and physicians who are over-providing